Developing on a Pocket CHIP with “Motor”, a Text-based IDE

Nothing like a Text-based UI

A recent discussion on the Pocket C.H.I.P forums made me dig up memories of my time with DJGPP (a wonderful DOS port of GCC), and its quite functional text-based IDE; RHIDE.

I thought that it would be great to have RHIDE running on my Pocket CHIP for doing simple C/C++ development on the go, as TUIs (Text-based User Interfaces) were pretty simple and could work in really low resolutions, but unfortunately CHIP’s ARM architecture was completely foreign to RHIDE’s build scripts, and it refused to compile.

I’m definitely no Linux guru, but I reckoned that adding the architecture to the build script wasn’t going to be easy, especially since it apparently had several architecture-dependent libraries, modules, etc, so I embarked on a quest to find another text-based IDE for Linux, and that’s how I found Motor.

Sure, the project is 12 years old (last “build” is 3.4.0 from February 2005, and still more recent than RHIDE), but I thought that perhaps it could still work on a relatively modern Linux distribution, and to my surprise, it did (with a few gotchas, though).

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Using your Pocket C.H.I.P as a portable Logic Analyzer

Pocket C.H.I.P + USB Analyzer

So a time ago I purchased a cheap USB Logic Analyzer from eBay that works great with a PC, and it’s been really helpful to debug several projects to date. It uses the Logic software from Saleae as hinted by the label on it, although I am not sure if the device is supposed to be a cheap knockoff of one of the (pricier) genuine Saleae analyzers, or it was just designed to be “Saleae-compatible” and use their software. Read More